Research Programs in Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research at UF

Economic Evaluation in HIV Disease

Economic Evaluation in HIV Disease

The HIV pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research program  includes a number of economic evaluations of HIV treatment strategies, as well as related outcomes research.  Ongoing studies include the economic evaluation of induction-maintenance strategies, the use of pharmacogenetic screening for patients initiating abacavir, and the impact of adherence on antiretroviral resistance and cost-effectiveness.  Examples of published manuscripts from this program can be found here.

 

Pt. Decision-Making in Chronic HCV Infection

Patient Decision-Making in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection

The HCV research program in pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research focuses on identifying the factors that influence patients to initiate treatment (or not).  Low treatment rates in HCV have greatly hampered public health efforts to reduce the burden of liver disease.   HCV treatment historically has been characterized by high side effect burden, substantial economic cost, and a relatively low treatment success rate.  Recent advancements in HCV offer improved treatment effectiveness, likely with a reduced duration of treatment, but with additional side effects and cost.  An understanding of how patients evaluate the expected cost and benefits of treatment is needed to develop effective and efficient management strategies.

Related work in this area includes examinations of the cost of HCV care and the burden of complications association with advanced liver disease.  A related program focuses on the application of similar research techniques in other therapeutic areas.  Examples of published manuscripts from this program can be found here.

 

Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy

Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy

Information problems, uncertainties and externalities are inherently present in pharmaceutical markets.  Dr. Burcin Unel’s research focuses on analyzing the effects of such complexities on the industry structure, R&D incentives, drug prices and consumer welfare.  She is interested in designing policies that would lead to efficient coverage and quality of care, taking into account the externalities caused by the two-sided nature of the health care programs and the information asymmetries that lead to inefficient outcomes.  She is also interested in analyzing how different eligibility, financing and reimbursement strategies affect the market outcome and overall welfare.